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Scientific Revolution

During the 16th and 17th century the Scientific Revolution took off in the hands of scientists and philosophers such as Galileo, Copernicus and Kepler. Their minds alone and toegether has transformed a new way to understand and learn about science in a way that had never been done before. These scientists were not just trying to learn more about science, they were trying to get a better understanding about what it is and how ithas beome. All of their knowledge and skills have been used in such a way to understand how our small world fits into the big universe. Continue reading

Science Proves That Science is True

The Scientific Revolution refers to the time period of changes and developments in thought, technology, and areas of science such as physics, biology, mathematics, and chemistry that transformed the views on society and nature. The 16th and 17th centuries were right at the time of the Renaissance, where the concept of humanism became a part of the intellectual basis, and can oftentimes be defined as an age of development. These times sparked curiosity and hence discovery bridging modern day knowledge.

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The Radical Ideas of the Scientific Revolution

While today we view the Scientific Revolution as a period of significant change in math, science, metaphysics, and other related fields of study, in the sixteenth and seventeenth century, these changes had no effect on daily life. The name “Scientific Revolution” suggests that it was a sudden eruption of discovery and new ways of thinking; however, the revolution actually spanned over the time between the end of the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, thus making it a much more gradual change than the name implies. Due to its gradual nature, the revolution did not affect the average person, as it took time for the general population to adopt these radical ideas.

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What is the Scientific Revolution

The Scientific Revolution was the period of time where our thinking as humans changed and we began to modernize as a society. But what was the Scientific Revolution and how did this change of thought come to be? Obviously, this time period holds much relevance to our society today, but it surprisingly holds more than most people expect. Our thinking of the universe and how we inhabit earth drastically changed during the 16th to 18th century. The Scientific Revolution is a label for the period of time where scientific discoveries were made and ways of thinking changed so that the effects continue to be relevant in our society today.

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Contextualizing The Scientific Revolution

The commonly conceived notion of the Scientific Revolution during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is the tension between modern discoveries and methodologies against ancient traditions and practices. Many introductory science courses reflect on the contributions of Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. Their roles in establishing the distinction between religion and antiquated modes of thought and the natural sciences are no doubt, substantial. Yet, these select narratives are limited in scope and do not reflect the broader political, religious, and cultural factors affecting scientific progress. In The Scientific Revolution, Steven Shapin presents a broader context by discussing commonly undisclosed factors that shape the Revolution.

One reason why the Scientific Revolution is misconceived is due to the brevity in which students learn about the history of science. Courses typically have one or two days to go over these concepts, which glosses over two centuries worth of history. It is only in advanced coursework or independent study focusing on the Scientific Revolution that students can engage in a deeper level of analysis and inquiry. As a result, students that do not inquire about the history of science do not get a broader and deeper understanding of the myriad of contributing factors.

In the early seventeenth century, Francis Bacon believed there was a necessary to create a “catalog…of all the effects that could be observed in nature” (85), which is similar to how modern scientific organizations and standards operate today. Shapin argues the purpose of these catalogs was to provide a “register of fact…to provide the secure foundations of natural philosophy” (90). The metric system can be considered a modern example of a catalog as it is an internationally adopted decimal system of measurement used in all facets of life. Using the metric prefix system for weights, shipments of goods can be measured in a standard unit, kilogram instead of constantly converting between units. Another example is the world’s largest technical professional organization for the advancement of technology (IEEE), which has established standards for software and research development life-cycles. Many research facilities, universities, and companies adhere to the IEEE standards today. In the early seventeenth century, Francis Bacon understood the need for these catalogs, which have manifested in modern scientific organizations and standards.

Against most preconceived notions of the Scientific Revolution, modern science emerged under the influence of various intellectual and societal factors. As Shapin describes, the contributions of religion,  philosophy, and naturalism were additional factors affecting the development of scientific inquiry. Legacies of the Scientific Revolution are still apparent today in the form of internationally recognized scientific organizations and standards. Despite the importance of the Scientific Revolution, not every person will dig deeper into its complex history. Most people blindly accept and take for granted the science and technologies they depend on everyday.

Shapin, Steve. The Scientific Revolution. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996.

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