Spotlight on Climate Change

This fall, the Colby Museum is featuring a slate of exhibitions and objects that examine the complex relationships between humans and the environment. To continue the conversations started in our galleries, The Lantern is soliciting submissions about art and climate change that expand on these shows and the larger themes they address. Interested in responding to a specific work or reflecting on the role of artists and art institutions in addressing the climate crisis? We are accepting written and multimedia submissions now. Please contact Anne Lunder Leland Curatorial Fellow Olivia Fountain with questions or proposals.

  • Going with the Flow: Reflections on Dams, the Wild, and Interrupted Rivers
    Going with the Flow: Reflections on Dams, the Wild, and Interrupted RiversInterrupted River: Penobscot by Maya Lin addresses our cultural perception of rivers as the embodiment of all that is free-flowing, wild, and unconfined. The work, composed of clear marbles glued directly to the gallery wall to depict moving water, includes blank, white gaps in the flow to indicate the presence ...
  • Murder, Chaos, and Fornication: Dystopian Environmental Futures in Alexis Rockman’s Paintings
    Murder, Chaos, and Fornication: Dystopian Environmental Futures in Alexis Rockman’s PaintingsThis essay is adapted from an assignment in the Colby College course Environmental Humanities: Stories of Crisis and Resilience, taught by Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Environmental Humanities Christopher Walker.  Alexis Rockman’s paintings Disney World I and East 82nd Street in the exhibition Occupy Colby: Artists Need to Create on the Same Scale That Society Has ...
  • View a digital version of Up in Smoke, a companion to River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames
    View a digital version of <em>Up in Smoke</em>, a companion to <em>River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames</em>Click below to view a digital version of Up in Smoke, a companion guide now available in River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames. Up in Smoke features an essay by Gail Carlson, assistant professor of environmental studies at Colby College, and introductory text by curators Shalini Le Gall and Justin McCann. 
  • Artistas americanos contra el cambio climático
    Artistas americanos contra el cambio climáticoClara Ortiz is an Argentinian artist who works with natural fibers. Her practice, which includes making her own dyes, references the life and memory of her people. She visited the Colby Museum in October 2019 and wrote this review for leedor.com, a Spanish-language arts and culture website. You can read the original ...
  • Nature and Culture in River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames
    Nature and Culture in <em>River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames</em>In these short essays, Tilly Peck ’22 and Mae Sefransky ’20 reflect on the nature vs. culture debate vis-a-vis River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames. Both pieces are adapted from an assignment in the Colby College course Environmental Humanities: Stories of Crisis and Resilience, taught by Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Environmental Humanities Christopher Walker.      Nature: ...
  • Photo Essay: Paddling the Messalonskee
    Photo Essay: Paddling the MessalonskeeOn September 15 and September 22, Colby College Director of Outdoor Education Ryan Linehan led two canoe trips on the Messalonskee River in conjunction with tours of the exhibition River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames. Joseph Bui ’22 photographed the trip, and Ryan offered the following thoughts on the ...
  • Lunder Institute Panel Discussion: What Role do Artists Have to Play in Addressing Climate Change?
    Lunder Institute Panel Discussion: What Role do Artists Have to Play in Addressing Climate Change?On Wednesday, September 18, Lunder Institute Fellow Phong Bui sat in conversation with artists Alexis Rockman and Allyson Viera and Colby professors Denise Bruesewitz and Keith Peterson to explore the idea that artists need to create at the same scale that society has the capacity to destroy. The panel discussion, organized ...
  • Brown Ash Endangerment and Indigenous Solutions
    Brown Ash Endangerment and Indigenous SolutionsBrown ash trees, also known as black ash, are critically endangered throughout the state of Maine. The emerald ash borer (EAB), a parasitic beetle that has already killed ash trees across the United States, was first detected in Maine last May—several years before it was anticipated. Faced with these ongoing ...