“Big Dams, Big Damage?  Why Big States Destroy Nature and Move Millions of People in the Name of Progress,” Paul Josephson (History, Colby)

EC Oct. 30, Friday at 4:00, Family Weekend in Lovejoy 100

StalinOver the last 100 years national powers have focused tremendous resources on such big projects as dams (Hoover, Tucurui, Three Gorges), canals (Panama and Suez), and other extensive earth-moving operations.  These projects have had tremendous human and environmental costs as we learn more and more.  Less well known is why governments as different as Russia, Brazil and the US continue to support them — from Amazonia, to the Tennessee Valley, to Washington State, and to the Arctic and Siberia.

 Paul Josephson, Professor of History at Colby College and affiliated with the STS Program, is a specialist in the history of twentieth century science and technology, Russian and Soviet history, and environmental history. He is working on a history of major nature engineering projects in the former Soviet Union.

Student Discussions:

  • Politics and Power Over Nature December 14, 2015 Kay ShigemoriThe lecture on “why big states destroy nature” was about the role of politics and state power on water control. It was an interesting lecture, as I had never put ...
  • Dam, it’s actually something quite important November 3, 2015 Joshua  Despite all the ‘punny’ things you can say about big dams, Professor Paul Josephson gave a very interesting talk entitled, “Big Dams, Big Damage? Brute Force Technologies and 20th Century ...
  • Body is Earth October 30, 2015 mekoppOur body is Earth. “Our bones breath and blood are the minerals, air and water inside us, not separate but same”. When we go to a new place we soon ...
  • The State’s Power Over Nature October 30, 2015 wavinkeIn his lecture, Professor Josephson talked about massive construction projects all over the world, which many of the worlds major powers have undertaken in the past 100 years. The part ...