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Medieval Religious Law

Much of my research focuses on medieval religious laws regarding adherents of foreign religions.  What ideas do such laws communicate about “them” — and about “us”?  What influences these ideas, and how do they change over time?

Canon Law

“Muslims in Canon Law, 650–1000,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 1 (Leiden: Brill, 2009), 99–114 [link to pdf]

“Muslims in Western Canon Law, 1000–1500,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 3 (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 41–68 [link to pdf]

“Muslims in Eastern Christian Law, ca. 1000–1500,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 4 (Leiden: Brill, 2012), 45-57 [link to pdf]

Islamic Law

“Christians in Early and Classical Sunni Law,” in Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 1 (Leiden: Brill), 83–98 [link to pdf]

“Christians in Early and Classical Shiʿi Law,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 3 (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 27–40 [link to pdf]

Rabbinic Law

“Conceptions of Muslims and Christians in the Halakhic Literature of the Geonim and Rishonim,” invited seminar presentation delivered at the Goldstein-Goren International Center for Jewish Thought, Ben-Gurion University in the Negev, March 26, 2012 [link to video]

Of Related Interest

“Why Jewish Studies Scholars Should Care about Christian–Muslim Relations,” AJS Perspectives, Spring 2012: 14–15 [link to pdf]