Skip to content

Categories:

Medieval Religious Law

Much of my research focuses on medieval religious laws regarding adherents of foreign religions.  What ideas do such laws communicate about “them” — and about “us”?  What influences these ideas, and how do they change over time?

Canon Law

“Jews, Pagans, and Heretics in Early Medieval Canon Law,” in Jews in Early Christian Law: Byzantium and the Latin West, 6th–11th Centuries, ed. John Tolan et al. (Turnhout: Brepols, 2014), 73–91 [link to pdf]

“Muslims in Canon Law, 650–1000,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 1 (Leiden: Brill, 2009), 99–114 [link to pdf]

“Muslims in Western Canon Law, 1000–1500,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 3 (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 41–68 [link to pdf]

“Muslims in Eastern Christian Law, ca. 1000–1500,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 4 (Leiden: Brill, 2012), 45-57 [link to pdf]

Islamic Law

“Christians in Early and Classical Sunni Law,” in Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 1 (Leiden: Brill), 83–98 [link to pdf]

“Christians in Early and Classical Shiʿi Law,” Christian–Muslim Relations: A Bibliographic History, ed. David Thomas et al., vol. 3 (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 27–40 [link to pdf]

Rabbinic Law

“Conceptions of Muslims and Christians in the Halakhic Literature of the Geonim and Rishonim,” invited seminar presentation delivered at the Goldstein-Goren International Center for Jewish Thought, Ben-Gurion University in the Negev, March 26, 2012 [link to video]

Of Related Interest

“Why Jewish Studies Scholars Should Care about Christian–Muslim Relations,” AJS Perspectives, Spring 2012: 14–15 [link to pdf]