haiti revoltJeremy D. Popkin, William T. Bryan Chair of History (University of Kentucky)

Monday, Nov. 14 at 7:00 in Lovejoy 100

Although the events it describes occurred over two hundred years ago, the term “Haitian Revolution” has only come into widespread use in the past few decades.  By putting the events that led to the western world’s first abolition of slavery on the same level as the American and French revolutions, this new language profoundly changes our understanding of the “age of revolutions.”  The explosion of new scholarship on the Haitian Revolution is also changing our understanding of the meaning of this event and its place in world history.

Jeremy D. Popkin is the William T. Bryan Chair of History at the University of Kentucky.  His books on the Haitian Revolution include Facing Racial Revolution: Eyewitness Accounts of the Haitian Uprising (University of Chicago Press, 2007), You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery (Cambridge University Press, 2010), A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution (Blackwell/Wiley, 2012), and Mon Odyssée: L’épopée d’un colon de Saint Domingue (Société française d’étude du dix-huitième siècle, 2015).  He has also published on topics including the French Revolution, autobiography, and historiography.

Student Discussions

  • Thoughts about the Haitian Revolution December 21, 2016 Stacey HouThe Haitian Revolution, on the same stage as the American revolution and the French revolution, was the first revolution in the Western world to abolish slavery, and this field of ...
  • Revolution of Revolutions December 20, 2016 Matthew HoffmanI think that Professor Jeremy Tompkins lecture was really interesting in that it added to the discussions of other lectures that we have had in the class cycle already. ...
  • Revolution in Retrospect: The Haitian Revolution December 19, 2016 Ben TheyerlThe most interesting aspect of Mr. Popkin’s lecture to me was that it was being presented as a revolution that the Haitian Revolution was now being studied.  Because for all ...
  • I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now December 19, 2016 swgray20Professor Jeremy Popkin spoke about the Haitian Revolution, something I had never heard about before this talk. Throughout my schooling, I have studied the American Revolution at different times and ...
  • New Perspectives on the Haitian Revolution December 19, 2016 Jaritza AbreuThe Haitian Revolution and the Origins of Modern Democracy was presented by Jeremy D. Popkin is the William T. Bryan Chair of History at the University of Kentucky. He focused ...
  • Discrepancies Between Histories December 19, 2016 mwyndhamProfessor Popkin’s account of the Haitian Revolution was particularly interesting for me because I had recently written a paper in my Anthropology class about Paul Farmer’s conceptualization of systemic violence, ...
  • “I am not an activist, but a personal advocate to protect people.” December 19, 2016 Reggie HuangThis Tuesday, I had a chance to have a meal LaToya Ruby Frazier and I attended her lecture on Thursday. She made me rethink about the art as a weapon ...
  • Hidden Revolutions December 18, 2016 Grace CarrollJeremy Popkin’s talk “Haitian Revolution and the Origins of Modern Democracy” discussed the many revolutions Haiti underwent (1776, 1789, and 1804) to establish itself as a democracy. Popkin provided insight ...
  • The Necessity and Identity of Social Revolutions December 18, 2016 William ReynoldsAs we have spent months focusing on the theme of Revolutions, I have thought back to countless history classes detailing the revolutions of developed nations worldwide.  However, as the semester ...
  • The Haitian Revolution December 18, 2016 Alisha LeeProfessor Popkin’s main point of emphasis of his lecture on the Haitian Revolution was the lack of knowledge and coverage it gets in American society and education institutions. While this ...