Marcos Perez, Postdoctoral Fellow in Sociology (Colby)

Dec. 6 at 7:00 in Lovejoy 100

ProtestersThroughout history, individuals have organized with others to bring about radical social change. What is it like to be on the front lines fighting for social transformation? Why do people risk life and limb to do so? Social science has addressed these questions in many different ways. This talk will focus on three particularly contentious debates.

First, the problem of human agency: what is the role of individuals in the outcome of revolutions? What matters more for social change, the effort of militants or the contradictions of the order they seek to change?

Second, the role of rationality. Much of the discussion on revolutions and activism has centered on whether insurgency is a rational decision by individuals and groups, an emotional reaction to a particular environment, or a mix of both. What are the different motivations to become a revolutionary?

Third, the location of revolution. What (and where) is the best context for revolutionary change? In more or less developed societies? In urban or rural areas? In the global south or north?

Marcos Perez is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Deparment of Sociology. He obtained his PhD at the University of Texas at Austin, and his research focuses on the experiences of activists in the Unemployed Worker’s Movement in his native Argentina. He has also written about the DREAMer Movement in the United States.

Student Discussions

  • Revolutionary! Or Not? December 20, 2016 Stacey HouAs humans we have come a long way. Existing on earth for merely over 10,000 years, we have come to build the grand monuments and the tiny smartphones; both unthinkable ...
  • Never Revolution? December 20, 2016 Matthew HoffmanIn thinking about how we perceive revolution, it is important to note that there are many definitions of revolution that we have discussed. There are social revolutions, those of government, ...
  • No Modernity? December 20, 2016 William ReynoldsKeith Peterson discussed the intricacies of revolutions in his lecture, and prompted the question of why humans want to revolt in the first place, if at all. Peterson used Latour’s ...
  • Just What Was That December 19, 2016 Ben TheyerlThat’s the question I had after I sat in on K.P’s lecture.  It was one that I perhaps lacked the philosophical background to deal with, but it left me with ...
  • “You say you want a revolution, well, you know, we all want to change the world…” December 19, 2016 swgray20Professor Peterson spoke in stark contrast to the other talks given during the revolutions lectures. He discussed at length the ideas of Bruno Latour, specifically in his book We Have ...
  • Rethinking Modernity December 19, 2016 Jaritza AbreuKeith Peterson, an Assistant Professor of Philosophy from Colby gave his talk on How We Have Never Been Revolutionary. He focuses his talk on Latour, Bruno’s book We have Never Been ...
  • How are we not revolutionary? December 19, 2016 smmitt20On November 29th, I had the opportunity to listen to Keith Peterson, who discussed in length about Bruno Latour’s highly controversial philosophies, the major one being whether we have actually ...
  • Connecting the Dots of Latour December 19, 2016 mwyndhamProfessor Keith Peterson argued to us that “We Have Never Been Revolutionary.” According to Bruno Latour, we have never even been modern. Admittedly, I found it challenging to follow this ...
  • Preservation or Addition? December 19, 2016 Reggie HuangProfessor Schnapp discussed an interesting project “Bz ’18-’45,” which they modified old monuments and added modern elements. He began his lecture with an introduction of modern monument. He argued that ...
  • More Revolutionary Questions than Answers December 18, 2016 Maya MeltsnerColby Professor Keith Peterson’s lecture titled ‘We Have Never Been Revolutionary’ reinforced some of the questions about the nature of a revolution that have continually popped into my mind throughout ...