Interview with Reem Saad

1. How has your Egyptian background influenced you and your relationship with anthropology? How has your duel identity as an anthropologist and an Egyptian affected you during the Egyptian Revolution?

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2. In the United States, the news sources have called Egypt’s protests as a part of Arab Spring. For our website purposes, we have been calling the protests as the Revolution. Could you tell us what terminology you use to describe Egypt’s happenings? What do Egyptians refer to them as?

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3. From the time the Revolution started on Jan. 25th to Mubarak stepping down, could you please give us your account on what happened during those 18 days?

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4. What were your original thoughts about the Revolution, and if your opinions have changed, how have they done so?

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5. We have been looking at news sources, ranging from international news, to US news, to Egyptian local news, and their coverage on the 18 days. Compared to what has been actually occurred within Egypt, do you think the different news sources have given an accurate portrayal?

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6. Who do you think the news left out of the Revolution coverage?

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7. In regards to your studies on peasantry, how does peasantry and class issues factor into the Revolution?

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8. The news mostly covered young, educated men as the people who were protesting. Did women have a large role in the Revolution?

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9. What was the environment of the 18 Days in Tahrir Square like?

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10. We understand that Egypt’s current situation is very complex, but do you have any ideas of possible solutions or ideas of the next steps Egypt’s protests will take?

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