This is a resource of podcasts and podcast scripts intended for the educational purpose for interns. This is a 5-podcast series focusing on global and nation-wide issues relating to farming and food justice, and narrowing in on the impacts of small farms, and in particular the work of Colby’s garden and farms around Maine.

Common Problems in Food and Agriculture

Description: This podcast is an introduction to a short series introducing new farmers and gardeners to the social issues surrounding farming and food inequity. Particularly focusing on ways small farms in Maine can play a role in addressing food equity, the podcast presents prevalent problems and ways that gardeners and farmers can work toward solutions on a local level. The background music is “Life in Letters” by Ketsa from the album “Firmament.”

Large, Medium, and Small Farm Comparison

Description: This podcast describes the three different sizes of farms: large, medium, and small, and discusses their techniques and impact on the environment. The music for this podcast is called “Difference in a Day” by Ketsa, on the album “Refraction.”

 

Small Farm Practices

Description: This podcast describes common methods of small farms and gardens. In particular, it describes no/low till methods, permaculture, and Integrated Pest Management (IPM). This discussion is crafted for new gardeners or farmers to learn more about the practices of small farms, especially those in Maine and near Waterville. To learn more about IPM, go to http://web.colby.edu/cofga/documents/. The music used in the podcast is called “Greener Grass (remix)” by Ketsa on the album “Paradigms.”

 

Garden as Social Actor

Description:  This podcast describes local food inequities in Maine, showing ways that small farms and gardens can be social actors, using models of farms and food banks in central Maine. The music is called “Contented” by Ketsa, on the album “Refraction.”

 

Garden as Community and Learning Space

Description: This podcast describes the impact a garden can have on the surrounding community, particularly focusing on connecting with young students, and how the interactive, educational, and community-oriented nature of gardens, like Colby’s garden, could help sustain student motivation and support in school. The background music is called “A Nice Life” by Ketsa, part of the album “Firmament.”

 

Benefits of Houseplants

Description: This podcast describes the physical and psychological benefits of houseplants. This is intended to accompany a houseplant workshop, helping to explain why houseplants are important. The music used in this podcast is “Lastly” by Ketsa in the album, Refraction.

Podcast scripts

Though it is encouraged to listen, you can also read the scripts.

What are Common Problems in Food and Agriculture?

Large, Medium, and Small Farm Comparison

Small Farm Practices

Garden as Social Actor

Garden as Community and Learning Space

Benefits of Houseplants

 

Works Cited on Podcasts

What are Common Problems in Food and Agriculture?

Wolfram, T., 2017. “The Hungry and Overweight Paradox.” Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/weight-loss/overweight-and-obesity/the-hungry-and-overweight-paradox

 

Large, Medium, and Small Farm Comparison

AJL, 2009. “USDA Census (Part 1): Small Farms on the Rise in America.” Inside Climate News. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from:https://insideclimatenews.org/news/20090217/usda-census-part-i-small-farms-rise-america

Berleant, A., 2013. “Small Farms on the Rise in Maine.” Weekly Packet. Accessed on November 3rd2017, from: http://weeklypacket.com/news/2013/jul/3/small-farms-on-the-rise-in-maine/#.WfzJfdPyslJ

Burns, C., Kuhns, R., 2016. “Mid-Size Family Farm – Is it Quietly Disappearing? – USDA Report.” AGFAX. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: http://agfax.com/2016/11/08/mid-size-family-farm-is-it-quietly-disappearing-usda-report/

Dephillis, 2013. “Farms are Gigantic Now. Even the ‘Family-Owned’ Ones.” The Washington Post. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2013/08/11/farms-are-gigantic-now-even-the-family-owned-ones/?utm_term=.5450d85edb7d

Lang, S., 2008. “Eating Less, Eating Local, and Eating Better Could Slash U.S. Energy Use, CU Study Finds.” Cornell Chronicle. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2008/08/cut-energy-use-eating-better-cu-study-says

Plotnick, 2016. “Farmers: 7 Different Types of Farms.” NewsMax. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/farmers-different-types-business/2016/10/11/id/752728/

 

Small Farm Practices

EPA, 2017. “Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Principles.” EPA. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://www.epa.gov/safepestcontrol/integrated-pest-management-ipm-principles

Google Dictionary, 2017. “Permaculture.” Google Dictionary. Accessed November 3rd, 2017, from: https://www.google.com/searchq=permaculture+definition&oq=permaculture+

definitin&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.4710j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Greentumble.com, 2016. “Pros and Cons of No-Tillage Farming”. Greentumble.com. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://greentumble.com/pros-and-cons-of-no-tillage-farming/

Resilience Hub, 2017. “Our Work.” The Resilience Hub. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://resiliencehub.org/our-work/

 

Garden as Social Actor

Hunger Pains, 2017. “Hunger Pains: Widespread Food Insecurity Threatens Maine’s Future.” Preble Street and the Good Shepherd Food Bank of Maine. Accessed from: https://www.gsfb.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Food-Pantry-Report-2-6-171.pdf

Love, E., 2014. “The Relationships Between Local Food and Food Security in Maine.” Honors Theses. Paper 732. http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/honorstheses/732

Waterville Food Bank, 2016. “Learn About Hunger in Maine and the U.S.” Wartervillefoodbankorg. Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: http://watervillefoodbank.org/learn-more-about-hunger.html

 

Garden as Community and Learning Space

Maine Agriculture in the Classroom. “About Us.” Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: https://www.agclassroom.org/me/about/index.htm

Maine Department of Education. “Graduation and Dropout Data: 2015/16.” Accessed on November 3rd, 2017 from: http://www.maine.gov/doe/data/student/gradrates.html.

Maine School Garden Network. “About Us” Accessed on November 3rd, 2017, from: http://www.msgn.org/

West, R., Odum., J., 2016. “State of the States Report 2015: Poverty and Opportunity in the States: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.” Center for American Progress. Accessed from: https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/23080039/StateofStates-fullreport2.pdf

 

Benefits of Houseplants

Bringslimark, T., Hartig, T., Patil, G., 2009. The Psychological Benefits of Indoor Plants: A Critical Review of the Experimental Literature. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 29(4): 422-433.

Kobayashi, K., Kaufman, A., Griffis, J., McConnel, J., 2007. Using Houseplants to Clean Indoor Air. Hawaii Cooperative Extension Service: Ornamentals and Flowers.

Wolverton, B., Wolverton, J., 1996. Interior Plants: Their Influence on Airborne Microbes Inside Energy-Efficient Buildings. Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences, 41(2): 99-105.