1813

Colby College chartered by the Massachusetts Legislature as the Maine Literary and Theological Institute.

1820

1830

1833

After William Lloyd Garrison speaks at Colby, students form an Anti-Slavery Society.

1840

1847

Abolitionist Elijah Parish Lovejoy, Colby class of 1826, is killed in Alton, IL, becoming the first martyr to the freedom of the press.

1850

1855

Frederick Douglass visits Maine, including Waterville.

1860

1865

Sam Osborne, former slave and long-time janitor at Colby, arrives in Waterville.

1870

1875

Mary Low is the first woman to graduate from Colby.

1877

Louise Coburn graduates. She goes on to become the first female Trustee.

1880

1887

Adam S. Green is the first African American man to graduate from Colby.

1890

1900

Marion Osborne, daughter of Sam Osborne, is the first African American woman to graduate from Colby.

1908

Ninetta Runnals graduates.  She becomes a long-time Dean of Women and advocate for equal services for women at Colby.

1910

1920

1930

1932

The Colby chapter of Tau Delta Phi was established.  TDP was known for its nondiscriminatory membership practices and its acceptance of all racial and religious backgrounds.

1940

1950

In protest of low wages, a Colby student organizes a labor strike during the construction of the new campus.

1960

1961

Jackie Nunez fights for anti-discrimination policies at Colby.

1966

Andy Bear is the first Native American to graduate from Colby.

1970

African American students take over the chapel demanding change at Colby.
Students organize mass protests of U.S. Vietnam involvement following the deaths of four students at Kent State.

1980

1985

With President Cotter’s support, students protest for divestment of Colby funds in South Africa.

1990

1994

Students of Color United for Change demand multicultural housing and better treatment for students of color on campus.
A series of anti-Semitic crimes sparks a large rally against hate crimes on campus.

1999

With demands aimed at fighting institutional racism, Colby students stage a sit-in at President Cotter’s office.

2000

Colby students begin The Difference, a biweekly newspaper dedicated to issues of activism and social justice.
Colby students take part in several off-campus protests, such as the SOA, FTAA and Bush Inauguration.

2001

Hardy Girls Healthy Women founded by Lyn Mikel Brown (Education) and Karen Heck ’74

2002

The Coalition for Institutional Accountability drafts a supplement to Colby’s Stategic Plan.

2003

The Posse Program begins at Colby.

2008

A Cinco de Mayo party sparks protest.
An Hawaiian Lu’au theme for the First Day of Loudness sparks controversy.
Students, faculty, and staff occupy the Pulver Pavilion to protest racial insensitivity at Colby.

2009

Two male students of color are assaulted by Security in the Pugh Center. The incident sparks a week of protest, dialogue, and an official investigation.

2010

2011

Students, faculty, staff, and alumni advocate for a Gender and Sexual Diversity Resource Center.
Mules Against Violence (MAV) is established by students to raise awareness and promote conversation about  sexual violence and masculinity at Colby.

2012

Uzoma Orchingwa ’14 premieres his new film, “Black on the Hill,” which documents the experience of students of color at Colby.

2013

Students affiliated with “Reclaim Colby.” and calling for change at the College, unexpectedly step up to the microphone in Lorimer Chapel following President William “Bro” Adams’ Bicentennial Address on February 27th.
Gordon Fisher ’13 premieres his new film “Bicentennial,” which explores race, social class, and learning differences at Colby.